Is Mindfulness-based Interventions Useful in Managing Binge Eating Disorder?
Date of publication of the systematic review: November 2014
Design
Systematic review of 19 randomized controlled trials (RCTs).
Participants
A total of 804 participants (mean age range: 22 to 54 years, overall male % range: 0 to 30%) who were (i) diagnosed binge eating disorder (BED) or (ii) those with significant binge eating behaviour.
Intervention
Mindfulness-based therapies such as mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), mindfulness based cognitive therapies (MBCT) in original format or adapted to address binge eating, lasted from 6 hours to 20 weeks.
Comparator
Comparison 1: Mindfulness-based therapies versus waitlist or treatment as usual.
Major Outcomes
Outcome 1: Binge eating episodes using Eating Disorder Examination (EDE). Higher scores indicated more binge eating episodes.
Settings
The reviewers did not state whether the study was conducted in in-patient or out-patient settings.
Comparison    Mindfulness-based therapies versus waitlist or treatment as usual
Main Results
Compared to waitlist or treatment as usual, mindfulness-based therapy is significantly more effective in reducing binge eating behavior (effect size: -0.70, 95%CI: -1.16 to -0.24) as assessed by EDE.
Comparison: Mindfulness-based therapies versus waitlist or treatment as usual among binge eating participants
Outcomes No. of studies (Total no. of participants) Mean score/ No. of participants Heterogeneity test (I2) Effect size (95% CI) Overall quality of evidence*
Intervention Comparator
1 19 (804) Not reported Not reported 90% -0.70 (-1.16 to -0.24) Moderate
Keys: CI: confidence interval.
Comparison    Mindfulness-based therapies versus waitlist or treatment as usual
Main Results
Compared to waitlist or treatment as usual, mindfulness-based therapy is significantly more effective in reducing binge eating behavior (effect size: -0.70, 95%CI: -1.16 to -0.24) as assessed by EDE.
Comparison: Mindfulness-based therapies versus waitlist or treatment as usual among binge eating participants
Outcomes 1
No. of studies (Total no. of participants) 19 (804)
Mean score/ No. of participants Intervention Not reported
Comparator Not reported
Effect size (95% CI) -0.70 (-1.16 to -0.24)
Overall quality of evidence* Moderate
Keys: CI: confidence interval.
Conclusion
Benefits
Mindfulness-based therapy had shown significant impact on reducing binge eating behavior compared to waitlist or treatment as usual. For Outcome 1, the overall quality of evidence is moderate. Further research is fairly likely to have an important impact on our confidence in this estimate of effect.
Harms
No adverse events were reported.
Link to Original Article
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25417199
The synopsis is based on the following article:
Godfrey KM, Gallo LC, Afari N. Mindfulness-based interventions for binge eating: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Behavioral Medicine. 2015 Apr 1;38(2):348-62.


* Interpretation of quality assessment results:
• Very low: Further research is most likely to have an important impact on our confidence in this estimate of effect.
• Low: Further research is likely to have an important impact on our confidence in this estimate of effect.
• Moderate: Further research is fairly likely to have an important impact on our confidence in this estimate of effect.
• High: Further research is unlikely to have an important impact on our confidence in this estimate of effect.
• Very high: Further research is most unlikely to have an important impact on our confidence in this estimate of effect.

Details of assessment method can be found at Chung VC, Wu XY, Ziea ET, Ng BF, Wong SY, Wu JC. Assessing internal validity of clinical evidence on effectiveness of CHinese and integrative medicine: Proposed framework for a CHinese and Integrative Medicine Evidence RAting System (CHIMERAS). European Journal of Integrative Medicine. 2015 Aug 31;7(4):332-41.