Can Mindful Awareness Practices reduce psychological and behavioral disturbance among premenopausal early stage breast cancer survivors?
Data of publication of the randomized controlled trial: April 2015
Design
Randomized controlled trial (RCT).
Participants
71 women (mean age: 46.8 years) under age 50 who had completed early stage breast cancer treatment including local and/or adjuvant cancer therapy (except hormonal therapy).
Intervention
6 weekly 2-hour-long group Mindful Awareness Practices (MAPS) intervention.
Comparator
Comparison 1: MAPS versus wait-list.
Major Outcomes
Outcome 1: Perceived stress measured by Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Higher scores indicated higher perceived stress;
Outcome 2: Depressive symptoms measured by Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD). Higher scores indicated greater presence of depressive symptoms.
Settings
This trial was performed in an outpatient setting.
Comparison    MAPS intervention versus wait-list for MAPS.
Main Results
MAPS intervention had led to a significant reduction on perceived stress (p=0.004), but reduction on depressive symptoms was insignificant (p=0.094). Effects of the MAPS intervention were not maintained at 3-month follow-up.
Comparison: MAPS intervention versus wait-list among early stage breast cancer surviving premenopausal women
Outcomes No. of studies (Total number of participants) Mean score/ No. of participants Heterogeneity test (I2) MD p value Overall quality of evidence*
Intervention Comparator
1 1 (71) Not reported/ 39 Not reported/ 32 Not applicable as there is only 1 study. Not reported 0.004 Moderate
2 1 (71) Not reported/ 39 Not reported/ 32 Not applicable as there is only 1 study. Not reported 0.094 Low
Keys: MD = mean difference.
Comparison    MAPS intervention versus wait-list for MAPS.
Main Results
MAPS intervention had led to a significant reduction on perceived stress (p=0.004), but reduction on depressive symptoms was insignificant (p=0.094). Effects of the MAPS intervention were not maintained at 3-month follow-up.
Comparison: MAPS intervention versus wait-list among early stage breast cancer surviving premenopausal women
Outcomes 1 2
No. of studies (Total number of participants) 1 (71) 1 (71)
Mean score/ No. of participants Intervention Not reported/ 39 Not reported/ 39
Comparator Not reported/ 32 Not reported/ 32
MD Not reported Not reported
p value 0.004 0.094
Overall quality of evidence* Moderate Low
Keys: MD = mean difference.
Conclusion
Benefits
MAPS intervention significantly reduces perceived stress among premenopausal women who had received early-stage breast cancer treatment, compared to no intervention. However, the effect was limited to short-term follow up. For Outcome 1, the overall quality of evidence is moderate. Further research is fairly likely to have an important impact on our confidence in this estimate of effect. For Outcome 2, the overall quality of evidence is low. Further research is likely to have an important impact on our confidence in this estimate of effect.
Harms
No adverse events were reported.
Link to Original Article
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25537522
The synopsis is based on the following article:
Bower JE, Crosswell AD, Stanton AL, Crespi CM, Winston D, Arevalo J, et al. Mindfulness meditation for younger breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial. Cancer. 2015 Apr 15;121(8):1231-40.


* Interpretation of quality assessment results:
• Very low: Further research is most likely to have an important impact on our confidence in this estimate of effect.
• Low: Further research is likely to have an important impact on our confidence in this estimate of effect.
• Moderate: Further research is fairly likely to have an important impact on our confidence in this estimate of effect.
• High: Further research is unlikely to have an important impact on our confidence in this estimate of effect.
• Very high: Further research is most unlikely to have an important impact on our confidence in this estimate of effect.

Details of assessment method can be found at Chung VC, Wu XY, Ziea ET, Ng BF, Wong SY, Wu JC. Assessing internal validity of clinical evidence on effectiveness of CHinese and integrative medicine: Proposed framework for a CHinese and Integrative Medicine Evidence RAting System (CHIMERAS). European Journal of Integrative Medicine. 2015 Aug 31;7(4):332-41.